Thursday, January 28, 2010

179. Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation (OSSA)

ARGUMENTATION: COGNITION & COMMUNITY

May 18-21, 2011

University of Windsor

Keynote speakers:

David Hitchock
, Department of Philosophy, 
McMaster University
Paul Thagard
, Department of Philosophy
, University of Waterloo
Karen Tracy, Communication Department, 
University of Colorado

Submission Information

The Organizing Committee invites proposals for papers which deal with argumentation, especially as it intersects with cognition and/or community.
Abstracts prepared for blind refereeing must be submitted electronically no later than SEPTEMBER 7, 2010 to (write ‘[your last name] OSSA abstract’ in the subject line). They should be between 200 and 250 words long. Additional information on how to prepare proposals is available on the conference website, www.uwindsor.ca/ossa.

The J. Anthony Blair Prize

OSSA wishes to promote the work of graduate students and young scholars in
the field of argumentation studies. Thus we strongly encourage submissions from this group. The J. Anthony Blair Prize ($500 CDN) is awarded to the student paper presented at the Conference judged to be especially worthy of recognition. The competition is open to all students whose proposals are accepted for the Conference.

Financial Assistance for Canadian Graduate Students

Canadian graduate students who need financial assistance in order to attend should advise the Organizing Committee when they submit their proposals. For the purpose of the Conference, a graduate student is one who has not completed the graduate program by September 7, 2010. (Additional information about this prize will also be available on the website.)

Organizing Committee: 
H. V. Hansen – C. W. Tindale – J. A. Blair – R. H. Johnson

University of Windsor
184. TOC: College Composition and Communication

journal toc
Submitted by syntaxfactory on January 24, 2010 - 11:26pm


College Composition and Communication, Vol. 61, No. 2, December 2009

Note: Is all of this "rhetoric"? Clearly yes, and also clearly not.

I draw your attention to some articles: Glenn and Enoch on archival methods; Clary-Lemon on race and rhetoric; Peary on rhetoric and poetic in the 19th century; Whitburn on an eclectic kind of library research. From the professional angle, Bernard-Donals on unions for grad students.

The Cultural Studies symposium asks the questions:
How can a material or “ground up” perspective help clarify current discussions about the relationship of rhetoric and cultural studies?
• How can a historically informed examination of the development of
various programs help us understand the potential benefits and drawbacks
of the relationship between rhetoric and cultural studies?
• In concrete material situations (of curriculum or teaching), what
binaries or oppositions are reinforced by the slash relationship between
rhetoric/cultural studies? Which aspects are transformed in ways that
are expected or unexpected?
• How do rhetoric/cultural studies programs and collaborations allow for
a different kind of intervention in the public sphere? Or do they?
• In the classroom, what specific forms of inquiry are opened up? What
specific forms are closed down?
• What key terms facilitate and/or erase connections?

The Gold article on 19th century speaking, writing and journalism instruction may be of interest to rhetors in composition and communication.

”Eve Did No Wrong”: Effective Literacy at a Public
College for Women
In this article, I test claims made about rhetorical education for women in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by examining Florida State College for Women (FSCW), one of eight public women’s colleges in the South. I recover the voices of instructors and students by looking both at the interweaving strands of literature, journalism, and speech instruction in the English curriculum and how students publicly represented themselves through writing. I argue that the rhetorical environment at FSCW created a robust climate of expression for students that complicates our understanding of the development of women’s education in speaking and writing.

...

I draw your attention to the format. Huge swaths of this journal are teaser-printed in a single page in the print edition, then fulltext online. As a result, the diversity of genres in each issue is either multiplied (if you count the online material) or winnowed (as only the fully peer-reviewed articles appear fulltext in paper). Worth discussing for its implications for scholarship.

...

College Composition and Communication, Vol. 61, No. 2
http://www.ncte.org/cccc/ccc/issues/v61-2
183. cfp: Thomas R. Watson Conference: Working English in Rhetoric and Composition.

conferences and calls
Submitted by syntaxfactory on January 25, 2010 - 7:48pm


Thomas R. Watson Conference: Working English in Rhetoric and Composition. SUBMISSION DEADLINE: MARCH 1, 2010
full name / name of organization:
University of Louisville
contact email:
watson@louisville.edu
Thomas R. Watson Conference
Working English in Rhetoric and Composition:
Contexts, Commitments, Consequences
October 14-16, 2010
Louisville, KY

The eighth biennial Thomas R. Watson Conference in Rhetoric and Composition solicits proposals that examine the working of rhetoric and composition in the era of the globalization and localization of English.

•How can and do we work English (that is, employ, construct, and redesign it) in the process of learning and using it?
•How can we best make English work (that is, make it operate and function) effectively and equitably in public deliberations, cultural expressions, and educational practices?
•How do competing notions of the workings of the English language (that is, notions of its formation, apparatus, relations to other languages, and relations to the shaping of individual-collective selves and lives) affect teaching and research in rhetoric and composition?
•What different inflections of work and class are implied by these competing notions of working English?

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: Mar 1, 2010
For more information, visit our website: http://louisville.edu/conference/watson
Email Min-Zhan Lu, conference director: watson@louisville.edu
Or call: (502) 852-1252
183. cfp: Speculations: The Journal of Object Oriented Ontology

conferences and calls
Submitted by syntaxfactory on January 25, 2010 - 7:57pm


Do you read "the Rosewater Chronicles? If not, you missed the awesome discussion on the rise of the object in rhetorical studies.
http://www.joshiejuice.com/blog/?p=1386

Every student enrolled in the class discussed there should send their seminar paper here, I think:

Speculations CFP
Speculations: The Journal of Object Oriented Ontology
contact email:
speculationsjournal@gmail.com
Speculations: The Journal of Object Oriented Ontology

CALL FOR PAPERS

Speculations invites articles on topics related to object oriented philosophy, speculative realism or post-continental philosophy for its inaugural issue. Articles should not exceed 8000 words and should conform to the author’s guidelines outlined on the website. Submissions can be sent
electronically via the journal website or directly to the following e-mail address: speculationsjournal@gmail.com

Speculations is an open-access peer-reviewed journal. The deadline for submissions is February 28th 2010. Issue one is due to be published in early 2010 and will include submissions from Graham Harman, Ian Bogost and Levi Byrant.

http://www.openhumanitiesalliance.org/incubator/index.php/speculations/i...

Speculations

Our Mission: Speculations is the journal of object oriented ontology. We hope to provide a forum for the exploration of object oriented ontology, speculative realism and post-continental philosophy. Our aim is to facilitate discussion about the ongoing development of object oriented ontology and in particular to explore new directions in object oriented research. The journal is open access and peer-reviewed. The journal accepts short position papers, full length articles and book reviews.

Issue one is due to be published in early 2010 and will include submissions from Graham Harman, Ian Bogost and Levi Byrant. The deadline for Issue 1 is Feb. 28th 2010.

Inquiries and submissions can be sent to speculationsjournal@gmail.com
182. cfp: 2011 Special Issue: 'Race Matters' in the Obama Era

conferences and calls
Submitted by syntaxfactory on January 26, 2010 - 12:31am


Emptying out the cfp inbox.

...

2011 Special Issue: 'Race Matters' in the Obama Era Mark P. Orbe, Guest
Editor Submission Deadline: October 28, 2010

Barack Obama's improbable journey from Illinois State Senator to
President of the United States of America has been documented through an
abundance of national and international media outlets. The historical
significance of his election is undeniable and provides a valuable
opportunity to explore the realities of race in the U.S. For instance,
some see President Obama's rise to the highest office in the land as
evidence of a 'postracial America;' others critically examine how his
election has exposed the degree to which public perceptions remain
steeped in racialized realities. Regardless of one's perspective(s),
one thing is certain: President Obama's election represents a moment in
time that begs for scholarly analysis in regards to "who we are, where
we've been, and what the emergence of a leader like Obama can tell us
about our culture, our politics, and our future" (Asim, 2009, p. 3).
Consequently, the 2011 Special Issue of Communication Studies is
dedicated to explorations of 'race matters' in the Obama era.

Authors are invited to submit manuscripts that explore how communicating
about race has been affected by President Obama's election. Potential
topics may include (but are not limited to) the following: explorations
of public perceptions, analyses of various mass media, rhetorical
analyses of public commentaries, examinations of interpersonal and
intergroup relations, studies that focus on issues of race and identity,
as well as essays focusing on teaching about race. Ultimately, the
special issue seeks to produce a volume where communication scholars can
draw from a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches to
analyze explicit and implicit messages about race and what they reveal
about current realities regarding race relations in the U.S.

The guest editor for the special issue is Mark P. Orbe, Western Michigan
University, School of Communication, Western Michigan University,
Kalamazoo, MI 49009; (269) 387-3132. All manuscripts must be prepared
in accordance to the 6th edition of the Publication Manual of the
American Psychological Association or the 15th edition of the Chicago
Style Manual, and should contain no more than 7500 total words
(including tables, references, endnotes, and appendices). An electronic
file of the manuscript, prepared for blind review as a WORD document,
and a separate file with title of the manuscript, author contact
information, brief author bio, and manuscript history (if applicable)
should be submitted to orbe@wmich.edu no later than October 28, 2010.
181. TOC: Western

journal toc
Submitted by syntaxfactory on January 26, 2010 - 7:17pm


Western Journal of Communication: Volume 74 Issue 1

(http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=issue&issn=1057-0314&volume=74...) is now available online at informaworld (http://www.informaworld.com).

Special Issue:RHETORIC, PRAGMATISM, AND SOCIAL JUSTICE: SPECIAL ISSUE ON RHETORICAL CRITICISM

Introduction to Special Issue, Pages 1 - 3
Author: Greg Dickinson
DOI: 10.1080/10570310903463745
Link: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1057-0314&volume=...

(Self-)Portrait of Prof. R.C.: A Retrospective, Pages 4 - 42
Author: Charles E. Morris III
DOI: 10.1080/10570310903463760
Link: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1057-0314&volume=...

What Does Pragmatic Meliorism Mean for Rhetoric?, Pages 43 - 60
Author: Scott R. Stroud
DOI: 10.1080/10570310903463737
Link: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1057-0314&volume=...

To Hope Till Hope Creates: A Reply to “What Does Pragmatic Meliorism Mean for Rhetoric?”, Pages 61 - 67
Author: Mark J. Porrovecchio
DOI: 10.1080/10570310903463752
Link: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1057-0314&volume=...

Communication, Social Justice, and Joyful Commitment, Pages 68 - 93
Author: Stephen John Hartnett
DOI: 10.1080/10570310903463778
Link: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1057-0314&volume=...

The Streets of Laredo: Mercurian Rhetoric and the Obama Campaign, Pages 94 - 126
Author: Peter Simonson
DOI: 10.1080/10570310903466045
Link: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1057-0314&volume=...
180. TOC: Southern

journal toc
Submitted by syntaxfactory on January 26, 2010 - 7:22pm


Rhetoricians trained in composition may not realize that some of the most interesting work in speech-rhetoric happens in what are called "regionals" -- the journals of the regional communication associations (southern, eastern, western, central), each of which publishes one or more journals. They function typically, although not always, as microcosms of the interests of their membership -- meaning, not every journal has a high quantity of rhetoric articles.

But if you are looking for the bleeding edge, this is sometimes where to find it.

--David Beard, UM Duluth
...

Southern Communication Journal: Volume 75 Issue 1
(http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=issue&issn=1041-794x&volume=75...) is now available online at informaworld (http://www.informaworld.com).

Cinematic Genetics: GATTACA, Essentially Yours , and the Rhetoric of Genetic Determinism, Pages 1 - 16
Author: Ron Von Burg
DOI: 10.1080/10417940902896839
Link: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1041-794x&volume=...

Neo-Christ: Jesus, The Matrix , and Secondary Allegory as a Rhetorical Form, Pages 17 - 34
Author: Mike Milford
DOI: 10.1080/10417940902780686
Link: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1041-794x&volume=...

Negotiating a “Questionable” Identity: Commuter Wives and Social Networks, Pages 35 - 56
Author: Karla Mason Bergen
DOI: 10.1080/10417940902951816
Link: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1041-794x&volume=...

Apologizing for the Past for a Better Future: Collective Apologies in the United States, Australia, and Canada, Pages 57 - 75
Author: Jason A. Edwards
DOI: 10.1080/10417940902802605
Link: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1041-794x&volume=...

I Love the 80s : The Pleasures of a Postmodern History, Pages 76 - 93
Author: Charles Soukup
DOI: 10.1080/10417940902741514
Link: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1041-794x&volume=...

Review Essay: Davis Houck, Editor

Rethinking the First World War, Pages 94 - 116
Author: Carole Blair
DOI: 10.1080/10417940903485285
Link: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1041-794x&volume=...

Book Reviews: Davis Houck, Editor

A Review of: “David Domke and Kevin Coe, The God Strategy: How Religion Became a Political Weapon in America Ilan Ziv (writer, director and producer) and Serge Gordey (co-producer), Jesus Politics: The Bible and The Ballot. DVD.”, Pages 117 - 120
Author: Martin J. Medhurst
DOI: 10.1080/10417940903487489
Link: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1041-794x&volume=...

A Review of: “Deborah F. Atwater, African American Women's Rhetoric: The Search for Dignity, Personhood, and Honor”, Pages 120 - 122
Author: Jeffrey B. Kurtz
DOI: 10.1080/10417940903487497
Link: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1041-794x&volume=...

A Review of: “Thomas S. Frentz, Trickster in Tweed: My Quest for Quality in Faculty Life Leah Vande Berg and Nick C. Trujillo, Cancer and Death: A Love Story in Two Voices”, Pages 123 - 125
Author: Deborah Walker
DOI: 10.1080/10417940903487505
Link: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1041-794x&volume=...
179.
CFP & TOC: Praxis

conferences and calls journal toc
Submitted by syntaxfactory on January 28, 2010 - 10:11am


A journal that encourages faculty, grad student, and even undergraduate co/authorship across its genres. As the proudly note, they are also indexed in the MLA. Thanks to UT for supporting this resource.

CFP:
Twice a year Praxis: A Writing Center Journal publishes articles on writing center news, opinions, consulting, and training. The Praxis editorial board invites article submissions and article proposals from writing center consultants and administrators. We especially encourage writers to submit articles related to an upcoming issue’s theme (listed below). Responses to the previous issues' articles are also welcome. In addition, we welcome book reviews on subjects pertinent to writing center work. Since Praxis represents the collaboration of writing center practitioners across the country and the globe, consultants and administrators are also invited to suggest future issue themes and article ideas.

Manuscripts
Recommended article length is 1000 to 2000 words. Articles should conform to current MLA style (7th edition). Send submissions as a Word document e-mail attachment to Patricia Burns and Brooke Hunter at praxis@uwc.utexas.edu. Also include the writer’s name, e-mail address, phone number, and affiliation. Because Praxis is a Web-based journal, please do not send paper; we do not have the resources to transcribe printed manuscripts. Images should be formatted as jpeg files and sent as attachments.

TOC:
http://projects.uwc.utexas.edu/praxis/

Professionalization and the Writing Center
The Future of WPA Professionalization: A 2007 Survey
by Jonikka Charlton, University of Texas-Pan America
PhD specialization in writing-center and writing-program careers

The Writing Center and Professionalization: Preparing Teachers for Administrative Responsibilities
by Tiffany Bourelle, University of Montana Western
Work in a university writing center prepares instructors for later administrative duties

Engaging Peer Tutors in Voicing Insights from the Tutorial Process
Julian Brasington and Wendy Smeets, Liverpool Hope University
The place of the peer tutor in the British educational system

From Peer Tutors to Writing Center Colleagues: The Potential of Writing Center Internships
by Naomi Silver, Carrie Luke, Lindsey Nieman, and Nicole Premo, University of Michigan
Internships and investment in the writing center

Tutors Teaching Directors about Professionalism
by Claire Lutkewitte, Nova Southeastern University
Tutors and staff members as valuable resources

A Writer, an Editor, an Instructor, and an Alumna Walk into the Writing Center...
by Jennifer Jefferson, Amy Cohn, Ellen Goldstein, Chris Wallis, and Lindsey Campbell, Endicott College
Real-world professional experience in the writing center

Kairotic Moments in the Writing Center
by Tim Taylor, Nia Klein, Kristi McDuffie, Fern Kory, Devin Black, and Serena Heath, Eastern Illinois University
Making the most of proper timing in a consultation

Columns
From the Editors: Professionalization and the Writing Center
Praxis takes on Professionalization and the Writing Center

Professional Development at the UWC: Three Personal Experiences
by Alanna Bitzel, Stephanie Odom, and Andrea Saathoff, University of Texas at Austin
The intersection between various fields of study and leadership

The Merciless Grammarian
The Merciless Grammarian spews his wrath on nasty problems of grammar, mechanics, and style

Consulting
Bringing ‘Abnormal’ Discourse into the Classroom
by Virginia Tucker, Christopher Newport University
Michel Foucault and student discourse

Finding a Good Topic is Hard These Days
by Kelly Kamp, Western Kentucky University
Conducting effective brainstorming consultations

Featured Center: University of Denver Writing Center
Praxis visits the University of Denver Writing Center

Consultant Spotlight
Praxis interviews Sydney Boyd, an English and applied music major and a writing consultant at University of Idaho

Training
An Interview with Ben Rafoth on Writing Center Research, Dissertations, and Job Opportunities
by Rebecca Day Babcock, University of Texas of the Permian Basin
Ben Rafoth discusses current trends in the writing center field

Professionalizing the Everyday
by R. Evon Hawkins, University of Southern Indiana
A Review of The Everyday Writing Center: A Community of Practice

Mentoring Students with Special Circumstances
by Dr Katerina Koutsantoni, King’s College London
Connecting the personal and the professional

News & Announcements
CFP: Spring 2010 Issue of Praxis
CFP: Spring 2010 Issue of Praxis: Professionalization and the Writing Center, Part II

Praxis to be in MLA Bibliography Database!
Praxis: A Writing Center Journal has been invited to the MLA database

2010 MAWCA Conference Announcement
Individuals Shaping Writing Centers - Writing Centers Shaping Individuals

Monday, January 25, 2010

178. TOC College English, Vol. 72, No. 3, January 2010
http://www.ncte.org/journals/ce/issues/v72-3

Lone Wolf or Leader of the Pack?: Rethinking the Grand Narrative of Fred Newton Scott
Lisa Mastrangelo

Chaucer’s Haunted Aesthetics: Mimesis and Trauma in Troilus and Criseyde
Patricia Clare Ingham

Reconsiderations: We Got the Wrong Gal: Rethinking the “Bad” Academic Writing of Judith Butler
Cathy Birkenstein

Opinion: Writing for the Public
Mike Rose

Review: Is This Where You Live? English and the University under the Lens
Thomas Rickert

...

I wouldn't understand the Chaucer or the Butler critiques if I had (a) all day to read them and (b) Tim Machan on my left and Joshua Gunn on my right to ask for help. But the reclamation of Butler looks important to me.

But the piece on Fred Newton Scott manages to be a contribution both to the history and the historiography of rhetoric. And for those in Communication uninterested in Scott, there are digressions on Lane Cooper, for example, that are fascinating.

The Rickert review essay is important reading for questions of the profession and university, for both Comp and Comm (though admittedly there is a Comp bias). (And thanks to Rickert to calling out the recycling of the essay which claims that rhetoric/composition, by choosing to become a managerial field instead of an intellectual field, calls the storm down upon itself within the university.)

Finally, I paste John Schilb's editor's intro below, because it is useful.

...

College English has featured many articles about teaching composition to un-
dergraduates. Often, though, it has probed as well our own scholarly writing,
considering why and how we might need to alter our rhetorical moves. The
topic of our discipline’s typical discourse engages three of this issue’s contribu-
tors. Lisa Mastrangelo calls for historians of composition and rhetoric to abandon
“hero” narratives; Cathy Birkenstein traces and defends Judith Butler’s use of classic
argument; and Mike Rose explains how to make our prose more accessible to the
public. Given their focus, I’m newly aware that not all CE readers know the criteria
for judging the journal’s submissions. When the staff and I read a manuscript, we
decide first whether it merits external review. We grapple with a specific set of ques-
tions, which we then pose formally to the referees if we do send the manuscript out:

1. Why do you believe that this subject will or will not interest many readers of College
English? Why do you believe or doubt that nonspecialists would find this article acces-
sible?

2. To what extent has previous scholarship on the subject been acknowledged? What ad-
ditions or deletions, if any, would you recommend?

3. What significant ideas does this article add to what we generally know about this subject?
Why do you think future writers on this subject are or are not likely to cite this article?

4. How effective are the style and organization of this article?

5. Which of these actions do you recommend: accept, reject, or revise and resubmit?

Of course, readers of the same text may give different answers. In fact, rarely do their
minds utterly meet. (Sigh.) Still, whether the reviews coincide or diverge, I try to
help the author productively synthesize them. Meanwhile, articles like Mastrangelo’s,
Birkenstein’s, and Rose’s serve as a reminder that the current writing practices of
our discipline—and the standards for judging these—shouldn’t just be fetishized.
Both deserve careful reflection by us all.
177. TOC: Cultural Studies <-> Critical Methodologies
Contents: December 2009, Volume 9, No. 6
http://csc.sagepub.com/content/vol9/issue6/

Norman K. Denzin
"After Bush"
Cultural Studies <=> Critical Methodologies 2009 9: 703-706. [Abstract] [PDF] [References] [Request Permission]

Douglas Kellner
Media Spectacle and the 2008 Presidential Election
Cultural Studies <=> Critical Methodologies 2009 9: 707-716. [Abstract] [PDF] [References] [Request Permission]

Jack Bratich
What’s Left? On Turning Backs and Facing Facts
Cultural Studies <=> Critical Methodologies 2009 9: 717-720. [Abstract] [PDF] [Request Permission]

Carolyn Ellis
At Home with "Real Americans": Communicating Across the Urban/Rural and Black/White Divides in the 2008 Presidential Election
Cultural Studies <=> Critical Methodologies 2009 9: 721-733. [Abstract] [PDF] [References] [Request Permission]

Arthur P. Bochner
Transfer of Power
Cultural Studies <=> Critical Methodologies 2009 9: 734-740. [PDF] [References] [Request Permission]

Michael D. Giardina
Toward a Politics of Hope: Performing Political Reality in the Age of Obama
Cultural Studies <=> Critical Methodologies 2009 9: 741-763. [Abstract] [PDF] [References] [Request Permission]

Mary E. Weems
W: A Legacy of Shame
Cultural Studies <=> Critical Methodologies 2009 9: 764-767. [Abstract] [PDF] [Request Permission]

Gaile S. Cannella
"Change" in a Post-Bush Era: Revolution or Maintaining the Neoliberal Legacy
Cultural Studies <=> Critical Methodologies 2009 9: 768-771. [Abstract] [PDF] [References] [Request Permission]

Henry A. Giroux and Kenneth Saltman
Obama’s Betrayal of Public Education? Arne Duncan and the Corporate Model of Schooling
Cultural Studies <=> Critical Methodologies 2009 9: 772-779. [Abstract] [PDF] [References] [Request Permission]

Stephen John Hartnett
"An Ugly and Sickening Business," or, the Bush "Legacy" and the Decimation of Iraq
Cultural Studies <=> Critical Methodologies 2009 9: 780-786. [Abstract] [PDF] [References] [Request Permission]

Christopher D. Stonebanks
Secret Muslims
Cultural Studies <=> Critical Methodologies 2009 9: 787-792. [Abstract] [PDF] [References] [Request Permission]

Luis Miron
Ending a Nightmare, Beginning a Dream: Reflections on the Outcomes of the Election
Cultural Studies <=> Critical Methodologies 2009 9: 793-795. [Abstract] [PDF] [References] [Request Permission]

Grant Kien
An Actor Network Theory Translation of the Bush Legacy and the Obama Collectif
Cultural Studies <=> Critical Methodologies 2009 9: 796-802. [Abstract] [PDF] [References] [Request Permission]

Peter McLaren
Rehearsing Disaster’s Rehearsal: The Election and Its Aftermath in Obamerica
Cultural Studies <=> Critical Methodologies 2009 9: 803-815. [Abstract] [PDF] [References] [Request Permission]

Stephen R. Barnard and Jesse P. Van Gerven
A People’s Method(ology) A Dialogical Approach
Cultural Studies <=> Critical Methodologies 2009 9: 816-831. [Abstract] [PDF] [References] [Request Permission]
...

So, is this rhetoric? "Political Communication"? "Media Studies of Political Rhetoric?" "Cultural Studies of Political Communication?"

Some of my favorite rhetoricians are deeply embedded in cultural studies and critical theory. But does that mean that a journal like CS<->CM is germane to readers of the Blogora?
176. Writing Center Journal

journals
Submitted by syntaxfactory on January 18, 2010 - 8:39am


Just announced at the IWCA Blog:

The Writing Centers Research Project, which contains a print archive of writing center related materials, an online archive of the Writing Center Journal, an oral history archive, and national survey data on writing center operations and staff, is now located at the University of Arkansas Little Rock. The WCRP’s new website is http://casebuilder.rhet.ualr.edu/wcrp/ . Writing Center Journal is now fully searchable from the WCRP’s new site, and the online archive is once again available.
175. TOC

College Composition and Communication, Vol. 61, No. 2, December 2009

Note: Is all of this "rhetoric"? Clearly yes, and also clearly not.

I draw your attention to some articles: Glenn and Enoch on archival methods; Clary-Lemon on race and rhetoric; Peary on rhetoric and poetic in the 19th century; Whitburn on an eclectic kind of library research. From the professional angle, Bernard-Donals on unions for grad students.

The Cultural Studies symposium asks the questions:
How can a material or “ground up” perspective help clarify current discussions about the relationship of rhetoric and cultural studies?
• How can a historically informed examination of the development of
various programs help us understand the potential benefits and drawbacks
of the relationship between rhetoric and cultural studies?
• In concrete material situations (of curriculum or teaching), what
binaries or oppositions are reinforced by the slash relationship between
rhetoric/cultural studies? Which aspects are transformed in ways that
are expected or unexpected?
• How do rhetoric/cultural studies programs and collaborations allow for
a different kind of intervention in the public sphere? Or do they?
• In the classroom, what specific forms of inquiry are opened up? What
specific forms are closed down?
• What key terms facilitate and/or erase connections?

The Gold article on 19th century speaking, writing and journalism instruction may be of interest to rhetors in composition and communication.

”Eve Did No Wrong”: Effective Literacy at a Public
College for Women
In this article, I test claims made about rhetorical education for women in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by examining Florida State College for Women (FSCW), one of eight public women’s colleges in the South. I recover the voices of instructors and students by looking both at the interweaving strands of literature, journalism, and speech instruction in the English curriculum and how students publicly represented themselves through writing. I argue that the rhetorical environment at FSCW created a robust climate of expression for students that complicates our understanding of the development of women’s education in speaking and writing.

...

I draw your attention to the format. Huge swaths of this journal are teaser-printed in a single page in the print edition, then fulltext online. As a result, the diversity of genres in each issue is either multiplied (if you count the online material) or winnowed (as only the fully peer-reviewed articles appear fulltext in paper). Worth discussing for its implications for scholarship.

...

College Composition and Communication, Vol. 61, No. 2
http://www.ncte.org/cccc/ccc/issues/v61-2
Table of Contents

From the Editor
Deborah H. Holdstein

“Internationalization” and Composition Studies: Reorienting the Discourse
Christiane Donahue

A Unilateral Grading Contract to Improve Learning and Teaching
Jane Danielewicz and Peter Elbow

Cruising Composition Texts: Negotiating Sexual Difference in First-Year Readers
Martha Marinara, Jonathan Alexander, William P. Banks, and Samantha Blackmon

Site-Specific: Virtual Refinishing in Contemporary Rhetorical Practice
Joseph Janangelo

Drama in the Archives: Rereading Methods, Rewriting History
Cheryl Glenn and Jessica Enoch

Civic Engagement as Risk Management and Public Relations: What the Pharmaceutical Industry Can Teach Us about Service-Learning
J. Blake Scott

The Racialization of Composition Studies: Scholarly Rhetoric of Race Since 1990
Jennifer Clary-Lemon

Alternative Rhetoric and Morality: Writing from the Margins
David L. Wallace

WPA as Rhetor: Scholarly Production and the Difference a Discipline Makes
Debra Frank Dew

A Friend in Your Neighborhood: Local Risk Communication in a Technical Writing Classroom
Lynne Rhodes

Instructions for Systemic Change
Marika A. Seigel

Walking the Cliff’s Edge: The New Nation’s Rhetoric of Resistance in Apartheid South Africa
Bryan Trabold

Literacy Crisis and Color-Blindness: The Problematic Racial Dynamics of Mid-1970s Language and Literacy Instruction for “High-Risk” Minority Students
Steve Lamos

The Licensing of the Poetic in Nineteenth-Century Composition-Rhetoric Textbooks
Alexandria Peary

"Eve Did No Wrong": Effective Literacy at a Public College for Women
David Gold

Teaching Writing Teachers Writing: Difficulty, Exploration, and Critical Reflection
E. Shelley Reid

“You Fail”: Plagiarism, the Ownership of Writing, and Transnational Conflicts
Arabella Lyon

Writing Assignments Across the Curriculum: A National Study of College Writing
Dan Melzer

Close to the Heart: Teacher Authority in a Classroom Community
Steven L. VanderStaay, Beverly A. Faxon, Jack E. Meischen, Karlene T. Kolesnikov, and Andrew D. Ruppel

Brains v. Brawn: Classed and Racialized Masculinity in Literacy Narratives
by Rose, Rodriguez, Villanueva, and Gilyard Christie Launius

Second Language Users and Emerging English Designs
Jay Jordan

”Writing in Electronic Environments”: A Concept and a Course for the Writing and Rhetoric Major
Jeremiah Dyehouse, Michael Pennell, and Linda K. Shamoon

When the Tenets of Composition Go Public: A Study of Writing in Wikipedia
James P. Purdy

Rediscovering the “Back-and-Forthness” of Rhetoric in the Age of YouTube
Brian Jackson and Jon Wallin

Embracing Wicked Problems: The Turn to Design in Composition Studies
Richard Marback

Interchanges: The Value of Book Collecting for Research and Teaching
Merrill D. Whitburn

Interchanges: Solidarity Forever: Why TA Unions Are Good for Writing Programs
Michael Bernard-Donals

CCC Special Symposium: At the Intersections: Rhetoric and Cultural Studies as Situated Practice
Anita Helle, Elaine Richardson, Jay Jordan, Elizabeth A. Flynn, and Lisa Ede

Review Essay: Managing the Freshman Year
Thomas Deans

CCCC Secretary’s Report, 2008–2009

Guidelines for Writers

Announcements and Calls

CCC News

Thursday, January 21, 2010

174. There was a race-and-media controversy in Duluth, discussed here:

http://www.perfectduluthday.com/2010/01/18/northlands-news-center-the-mlk-version/
and
http://blogs.citypages.com/blotter/2010/01/jitterbug_the_t.php#comments
and
http://www.secretsofthecity.com/mnspeak/reporter-apologizes-for-racist-headline-on-mlk-day#comment-244719

I'm interested in non-apology apologies (e.g. "I'm sorry you feel that way"), and this one has some of those features.

My thoughts:

Comments on the Perfect Duluth Day site are closed on this topic. Julie Pearce is (I'm told) a good egg, and no negative consequences should come to her for this error. Things happen. As newsrooms shrink, more things will happen.

But -- there is something instructive to come from this apology. Note that it has two parts:

1. The sincere, genuine apology that helps mitigate the initial offense and warms us to Julie as a person.

2. The awkward attempt to make her rookie insensitivity a learning opportunity for others. The turning point is "However," a bad move because it appears to undercut whatever comes before it in any paragraph.

"I love you, however..."
"Normally, I vote Democrat. However..."

The turn is awkward because the apology starts to become about "we" instead of about "Julie."

However, let's all take this as a perfect lesson that as far as we have all succeeded in becoming more accepting of diversity, changing stereotypes, and shifting our thinking... we still have a long way to go... We're all so used to reading it, seeing it, and hearing it, that if we're not careful we become breeders of it without even realizing it... It can serve for all of us as a poignant example of... the room for improvement in all of our lives, and the ability to see when and where we all fall short.

I'm not sure who the "We" is here. Only one of "us" made the mistake. From the available evidence, one of us may or may not have "a long way to go" -- who are the rest of the "we"?

Now, I live in Duluth. I know we have a history of racial intolerance and a culture of intolerance, even, among us today. I'm not saying that what she says isn't true. My wife skims the "Rants and Raves" of Craiglist once in a while, a reminder of the culture of intolerance.

But the apology would have been more effective if it were only an apology, and not an apology that promises to teach all of us something about ourselves

Saturday, January 16, 2010

173. Cross-posted from Blogora:



Hello, Dr. Aune!

Rhetoric and argumentation strike me, like rhetoric and persuasion, to be tricky because each term can be configured to subsume the other.

Persuasion is one of the available goals of rhetoric (and so is a subset of it). At the same time, the rhetorical tradition is but one of many ways of understanding persuasion as a phenomenon (and so rhetoric is a subset of persuasion).

Argument is a form of rhetoric (and so a subset of rhetoric). At the same time, the study of argument is engaged by rhetoricians as well as philosophers, folks working in artificial intelligence, and discourse theorists like Frans van Eemeren (who is Professor in the Department of Speech Communication, Argumentation Theory and Rhetoric) -- rhetoric is just one of several ways of understanding argument.

Here's what I know: The teaching of argument is a common goal of speech rhetoricians, especially those embedded in the debate tradition, and writing rhetoricians interested in written argument, as well as our philosophical colleagues interested in "informal logic" and "critical thinking." God bless our single greatest interdisciplinary export across the three fields: Toulmin, Stephen, 1964. The Uses of Argument. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

(The best work to come from the recent Canadian philosophers, in this light, is: Tindale, Christopher W. Rhetorical Argumentation: Principles of Theory and Practice. Sage Publications. and Acts of Arguing: A Rhetorical Model of Argument. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press. YMMV.)

The call to pedagogy is what ties us -- phil, speech, comp, right?

...

As to whether someone is a rhetorical theorist or an argumentation theorist: that's a matter of self-identification ("I'm a rhetorician if I think I am one?").

Argumentation theorists whose work borders rhetoric identify with organizations like:

OSSA: Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation
http://web2.uwindsor.ca/cpa/OSSA/index.htm

Tokyo Conference on Argumentation
http://www.russcomm.ru/eng/rca_calend/konf-argum.shtml

ISSA: International Society for the Study of Argumentation
http://cf.hum.uva.nl/issa/

Speech rhetoricians, on the other hand, with a commitment to argument identify with:
American Forensic Association
http://www.americanforensics.org/
and its Alta conference
http://www.americanforensics.org/forensics/alta-conference/alta-conference

There are print and conference resources attached to all of these organizations worth a look to all rhetoricians.

...

But: I come to these communities as a visitor. You "came of age" in the culture of argument in communication studies, Dr. Aune. You grew up in the house I only know from across the street. What would you add?

--David Beard, UM Duluth

Saturday, January 09, 2010

172. TOC: Pub: INFORMAL LOGIC 29.4 (2009).

Articles:

* "Argumentative Thinking: an Introduction to the Special Issue on Psychology and Argumentation" Abstract PDF by Lance J. Rips 327-336
* "Argument Content and Argument Source: an Exploration" Abstract PDF by Ulrike Hahn, Adam J.L. Harris, Adam Corner 337-367
* "Belief-Overkill in Political Judgments" Abstract PDF by Jonathan Baron 368-378
* "What Constitutes Skilled Argumentation and How Does it Develop?" Abstract PDF by Marion Goldstein, Amanda Crowell, Deanna Kuhn 379-395
* "Differentiating Theories from Evidence: the Development of Argument Evaluation Abilities in Adolescence and Early Adulthood" Abstract PDF by Petra Barchfeld, Beate Sodian 396-416
* "Deliberation versus Dispute: the Impact of Argumentative Discourse Goals on Learning and Reasoning in the Science Classroom" Abstract PDF by Mark Felton, Merce Garcia-Mila, Sandra Gilabert 417-446

Critical Reviews:

* "Eemeren & Garssen's Controversy and Confrontation: Relating Controversy Analysis with Argumentation Theory" PDF by Frank Zenker 447-475

Book Reviews:

* Zenker's Ceteris Paribus in Conservative Belief Revision: On the Role of Minimal Change in Rational Theory Development" PDF by Pierre Boulos 476-478

Visit the Informal Logic wesite here: http://www.informallogic.ca/.

Wednesday, January 06, 2010

171.

I teach Business Writing. I'm amazed when corporations produce texts that would not pass my class. This correspondence would have failed. But maybe I'm too strict. Read from bottom up.

..................................................................................

From me:
An apology on the 12th day of Christmas is better than no apology. So yes, thank you.

.................................................................................

On Wed, Jan 6, 2010 at 12:34 PM, service wrote:

Dear David Beard,

Thank you for your recent email.

You are absolutely right, we should have apologized in our previous
emails, for any inconvenience the closing of our store on Christmas Eve
caused.

Please accept our sincere apologies for the inconvenience the closing of
our store caused you.

Once again, thank you for your feedback. It has been forwarded to
Management for review.

Sincerely,

Tanya H.
Customer Service Representative
Barnes and Noble Customer Service
customerservice@bn.com

............................................................................

Original Message Follows:
------------------------

rhetoricguy@gmail.com
1/3/10 12:14 AM

It's not particularly helpful, no.

The money I intended to spend was spent at other shops in the mall.
That may be more disappointing to me (with my unused coupon, good only
in-store) than to you.

*That you'll keep my feedback in mind when rethinking the policies that
allowed your store to be the only store in the mall closed on Chistmas
Eve day does little to help me, to recognize my disappointment or even
to apologize for the inconvenience.*

Had I known that the mall was open but the bookstore was not, I would
have shopped closer to home. Was it inconvenient to go to the mall that
day? It must have been, as none of your employees were there.

I recognize that the first reply was a template based reply, into which
my complaint was cut and paste; I'm not upset with the young people who
no doubt answer so many of these complaints every day. Perhaps the
template should include a simple apology for the inconvenience. It
could go a long way toward resolving my frustrations simply by
recognizing them.

David

...........................................................................

On Sat, Jan 2, 2010 at 1:59 PM, service
wrote:

Dear David Beard,

Thank you for your email.

When we sent you the first email response, and referred to "keeping
your
thoughts in mind", what is meant by that is that our management team
constantly monitors the feedback we receive from our customers, in
order
to keep up with policies which may at times need to be changed.

We hope the information has been helpful to you, and again we thank you
for your feedback.

Sincerely,

Anne
Customer Service Representative
Barnes and Noble Customer Service
customerservice@bn.com

............................................................................

Original Message Follows:
------------------------
What does it mean to "keep my thoughts in mind?"

David

............................................................................

On Tue, Dec 29, 2009 at 4:28 PM, service
wrote:

Dear Mr. Beard,

Thank you for taking the time to give us your feedback concerning our
mall location not opening on Christmas Eve. We are highly committed to
making our stores the ideal place for book lovers to shop, and always
welcome our customers? suggestions.

We assure you that we will keep your thoughts in mind as we review our
stores and the services they provide.

We look forward to seeing you in our stores again soon.

Sincerely,

Takia

Customer Service Representative
Barnes and Noble Customer Service
customerservice@bn.com

..............................................................

Disappointed that the only store in the Mall not to open on Christmas
Eve was Barnes and Noble. I would not have spent more than $75 (six
gift certificates for nieces and nephews and a graphic novel on which
I
would have used the 10% coupon), but still, disappointing.

David