Wednesday, January 06, 2010

171.

I teach Business Writing. I'm amazed when corporations produce texts that would not pass my class. This correspondence would have failed. But maybe I'm too strict. Read from bottom up.

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From me:
An apology on the 12th day of Christmas is better than no apology. So yes, thank you.

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On Wed, Jan 6, 2010 at 12:34 PM, service wrote:

Dear David Beard,

Thank you for your recent email.

You are absolutely right, we should have apologized in our previous
emails, for any inconvenience the closing of our store on Christmas Eve
caused.

Please accept our sincere apologies for the inconvenience the closing of
our store caused you.

Once again, thank you for your feedback. It has been forwarded to
Management for review.

Sincerely,

Tanya H.
Customer Service Representative
Barnes and Noble Customer Service
customerservice@bn.com

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Original Message Follows:
------------------------

rhetoricguy@gmail.com
1/3/10 12:14 AM

It's not particularly helpful, no.

The money I intended to spend was spent at other shops in the mall.
That may be more disappointing to me (with my unused coupon, good only
in-store) than to you.

*That you'll keep my feedback in mind when rethinking the policies that
allowed your store to be the only store in the mall closed on Chistmas
Eve day does little to help me, to recognize my disappointment or even
to apologize for the inconvenience.*

Had I known that the mall was open but the bookstore was not, I would
have shopped closer to home. Was it inconvenient to go to the mall that
day? It must have been, as none of your employees were there.

I recognize that the first reply was a template based reply, into which
my complaint was cut and paste; I'm not upset with the young people who
no doubt answer so many of these complaints every day. Perhaps the
template should include a simple apology for the inconvenience. It
could go a long way toward resolving my frustrations simply by
recognizing them.

David

...........................................................................

On Sat, Jan 2, 2010 at 1:59 PM, service
wrote:

Dear David Beard,

Thank you for your email.

When we sent you the first email response, and referred to "keeping
your
thoughts in mind", what is meant by that is that our management team
constantly monitors the feedback we receive from our customers, in
order
to keep up with policies which may at times need to be changed.

We hope the information has been helpful to you, and again we thank you
for your feedback.

Sincerely,

Anne
Customer Service Representative
Barnes and Noble Customer Service
customerservice@bn.com

............................................................................

Original Message Follows:
------------------------
What does it mean to "keep my thoughts in mind?"

David

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On Tue, Dec 29, 2009 at 4:28 PM, service
wrote:

Dear Mr. Beard,

Thank you for taking the time to give us your feedback concerning our
mall location not opening on Christmas Eve. We are highly committed to
making our stores the ideal place for book lovers to shop, and always
welcome our customers? suggestions.

We assure you that we will keep your thoughts in mind as we review our
stores and the services they provide.

We look forward to seeing you in our stores again soon.

Sincerely,

Takia

Customer Service Representative
Barnes and Noble Customer Service
customerservice@bn.com

..............................................................

Disappointed that the only store in the Mall not to open on Christmas
Eve was Barnes and Noble. I would not have spent more than $75 (six
gift certificates for nieces and nephews and a graphic novel on which
I
would have used the 10% coupon), but still, disappointing.

David

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